10/1/2014
 
 

 

FAQs

Below is a list of questions I have found over the years to be typical of everyone researching the Boerboel breed. Naturally, I can’t answer every question you may have on this page, but hopefully I can answer some of the most common. 

I want to open this page however; with a question rarely asked but one that should be at the very top of any interested buyers list of all important questions to ask ANY/ALL breeders you talk to: Are they licensed through their states Department of Agriculture as a licensed operating kennel with documentation that can verify this? 

Proffers Kennel has maintained licensing throughout our history and we're very proud of this.  Our license is issued by the State of Missouri Department of Agriculture; Division of Animal Health.  It certifies that we are a licensed Animal Care Facility w/License # CB 00005143.  What does this mean to you as a buyer?  ALOT!!!!!  Although most buyers never think of this, buying from a State Licensed Facility ensures you, the buyer, that this facility is meticulously inspected annually; that the dogs health is tracked by qualified veterinarian care, that their kennels, food, water and overall living conditions have passed rigid inspection.  My best advice to anyone is to make this your first question!!!!

Of even more importance, ask if the breeder provides a Certified Health Certificate provided thru thier states Dept. of Agriculture.  This is of the utmost importance to you as a potential customer because NOT having one would be like buying a brand new car without any warranty!!!

When your breeder provides you with a Health Certificate, it is your guarantee that you are receiving a puppy that has been checked from head to toe by a state certified, licensed veterinarian.  They check the puppy's eyes, his ears, mouth and throat.  They check his joints and glands, his heart for murmurs of any grade, on a male they make certain his testicles have dropped, they do fecal checks to make certain your puppy arrives free from any worms and/or parasites and guarantee he is free of any infectious, contagious or communicable disease.

Most customers have no idea of all the potential problems a new puppy can have, and keep in mind most of the more serious problems are not visible.So it's really up to you to ensure you are going to receive a Health Certificate with your new puppy.  Beware of a breeder who doesn't provide this service!

          Why is there such a price-range difference between  Boerboel Kennels?

Very good question!  To be clear, each and every breeder has the right to charge whatever they wish for their puppies.  I think often times new breeders get into this thinking they're going to make "the big money" and truth be told, an established, well-respected breeder of any breed will tell you if that's your reasoning, then save yourself alot of time, money and heartache.  I've seen so many breeders come and go I really can't begin to count them, but I can tell you this:  My price has not changed 1 cent since I sold my very first Boerboel 15 years ago.  You'll find all kinds of hype trying to justify some of the ridiculous prices out there, but in a nutshell, unless you have a well-established breeding program and are buying an adult Boerboel that is already of age to breed, I can't find one single reason to justify spending some of the amounts I've seen and heard of.  Think you're getting a better puppy because it cost so much more?  All you're getting is a much lighter wallet!!!

What is the temperament of a Boerboel?

The temperament of your dog will be what he/she is raised to be. Typically, a Boerboel is a calm, non-aggressive dog that has been bred to be a guardian. Because of their size people tend to question if they are mean or aggressive; the answer is no unless they have been trained by their owner to be such. I refuse to sell any dogs to people interested in bite or protection work as this in my opinion only contributes to giving this breed a bad reputation. When explaining this to people I normally tell them “If you have the two most vicious Pit Bulls in the world, they have a litter and you give the litter to me, I will raise that litter to be calm, assertive but non-aggressive dogs.” I firmly believe this and have not been proven wrong to date. I often recommend people purchase the books Cesar’s Way and Be a Pack Leader by Cesar Milan which clearly demonstrates the importance of teaching your dog obedience however; this is true of any breed. The Boerboel is a wonderful family guard dog and raised with obedience, thrives in a family environment.

How big will a Boerboel male/female get.

The size of your Boerboel may vary slightly however; I always tell prospective owners that a good male dog will typically weigh between 120- 150 or 160 pounds and rarely but occasionally bigger. The female of the breed will typically weigh between 90- 130 pounds and rarely but occasionally bigger. It is precisely because of their size that I am such a strong advocate of obedience. Even the most gentle of dogs this size are capable of accidentally causing a fall with a young child if they jump up on them even in play.

How much will a grown Boerboel eat per day?

More often than not, I see a Boerboel who is being “loved to death.” What I mean by this is oftentimes, people tend to feed their dog entirely too much! Their reasoning is always sincere but the result is not healthy for the dog. A typical adult Boerboel will eat 4 - 6 cups of food per day. I typically feed my adult breeding dogs ½ of a coffee can per day (which measures aprox. 6 cups) yet in the summer they tend to eat less. I’m not a huge advocate of table scraps because it can train the dog to not eat it’s food and instead, wait for your leftovers however; I see no harm in occasional meat scraps. While on this topic I should share that the only chew-toy I advocate is the Galileo bone. Rawhide tends to cause problems with the digestive tract therefore I advise against.

          Breeding Quality Puppies vs. Pet Quality; What IS the difference?

As soon as a litter of puppies is born, an experienced breeder will begin the selection process. For example, puppies with the wrong coloring or weak pigmentation do not comply with the breed standard. He will instantly know, therefore, that these puppies can not be sold as breeding quality; simply another term meaning "Show Quality'"

Between 2-5 weeks the breeder will know if any long hair is present on the back of the legs (undesirable). He will be looking at pigmentation, teeth (a scissor bite is preferred) He will be watching movement, balance, muscle structure, the way the ears are laying, etc. As Randy always says, no breeder has that magical crystal ball and therefore can not be precisely right 100% of the time, but at six (6) weeks of age an experienced breeder will have a fair idea and can begin grouping puppies into the following categories:

Puppies to keep back for his own breeding program

Puppies to sell to other breeders

Puppies that for reasons like those listed above he will sell as pets.

It’s very important to state that the pet quality puppy has the exact same vet-checks, shots, etc. to ensure the customer that they are receiving a healthy, up-to-date puppy that will wiggle it’s way into their hearts. Pet Quality simply means it does not meet the standards required to enter a breeding program.

 
 
Proffer's Kennel   HC64 Box 4660   Marble Hill, MO  63764   (573) 238-3470

powered by element 74